The Green Grass of SILVER BROWN

The Romancier’s Guide to Netflix, Part I

Most of the books I read during the (first?) COVID-19 lockdown were textbooks. As in, non-fiction. Try not to hate me for that; I have always consumed a wide gamut of literature. Figured I should make the best of a bad situation, using the downtime to learn a few new skills. For the inevitable moments when I felt like banging my head against a brick wall, be it from writer’s block, the fate of nations or a particularly troublesome bug in some app I was building, it was Netflix to the rescue.

The other night I happened across some animated series from India (presented in the original Hindi with no dubbing whatsoever, which I appreciated) depicting the hypothetical wacky adventures of Ganesha as a boy. A kids’ show, obviously. But kids’ shows are (more often than not) the shit after a couple of bong rips, so I decided to check it out. At first I found Bal Ganesh endlessly fascinating. I was being offered a glimpse into what kind of Saturday morning cartoons I would’ve been watching had the Fates decreed I be born on a different continent. Subsequent episodes impressed upon me that this was exactly like one of those gawd-awful religious shows my cousins used to watch when they were kids (if you have never heard of Psalty the Singing Songbook, consider yourself blessed), only with a Hindu angle to it. Once it dawned on me that every episode of this series basically has the same plot, the fatal flaw in its premise became abundantly clear to me; a flash of insight which I immediately tweeted…


The Journey of SILVER BROWN

A Chekhov’s Gun Who Pumps Iron

In the second chapter of SILVER BROWN there is a character known only as Nielsen, who could easily be written off as a throwaway character upon his initial introduction, but gradually becomes more important as the story progresses. There’s a point in the narrative where the shocking truth about him is revealed. I’m currently editing said point, finding it a challenging task that calls for nothing short of a channeling of the inner bard…


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My inner bard is something like this, except with tentacles.

 

The Journey of SILVER BROWN

The Parental Guidance of SILVER BROWN

A topic of discussion was brought up by one random soul in the vast swarm of tweeting romanciers earlier this month. It concerned the relationships (or if the case may be, lack thereof) that our hero(in)es have with their parents. An important question to consider when developing any and all major characters for works of fiction, methinks. Regardless of what the writer initially believes about that relationship’s relevance to the plot. Whatever input a young mind is fed during the formative years of their development would tend to have a lasting influence on shaping certain qualities and attributes of that mind, for either good or bad. Disposition. Approach to problem-solving. General outlook on life. That sort of thing. At least some of that input comes from the parents, but almost never all of it.

The question was open-ended, so I went with it. The website plug was something I tacked on at the end, because I just happened to have the link in my clipboard.


macnabs